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Home | Blog | (Gluten-Free Life Hack) Pasta in a T . . .
 

(Gluten-Free Life Hack) Pasta in a Thermos!
Elizabeth Carroll
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Photograph: Elizabeth Carroll
Photograph: Elizabeth Carroll

February 13, 2013

February 13, 2013


In my last piece, I mentioned how I  bring my own cooked gluten-free pasta to restaurants that have limited options for gluten-free diners.  Elizabeth asked how I did this.  It is probably not the best ever -- it's usually warm and not hot.  But, it's pretty good in a pinch!

 

Here's how I do it:

  1. Purchase a medium size, good quality Thermos -- the steel, not plastic, variety.

  2. Boil water on the stove or microwave -- enough to fill the Thermos. Put the water in Thermos and put on the top.  This critical step warms the Thermos before the pasta goes in.

  3. Boil the gluten-free pasta.  These days, I use Sam Mills gluten-free corn pastas.  Salt the water.  Cook until done.  Drain, rinse if desired.  Moisten with oil, butter, or a warm sauce.  

  4. Pour the boiled water out of Thermos and add the hot pasta.  Put on the top of the Thermos tightly.

  5. Voila!  You have a Thermos of pasta to take along.  Add to it a really big purse or handbag and no one will be the wiser!

 

I usually bring pasta with me when I know my daughter will be served a meat or fish entree. It makes a really nice side dish for her. I'll also send this along in her lunchbox for school lunches.

Tell me, what are some of your gluten-free "life hacks"? 

 

About the Author:
Elizabeth Carroll is a wife and mother of three living in the suburbs of Chicago.  She has been preparing gluten-free foods for her family, two of whom are eat exclusively gluten-free, since 2004.  Before staying home with her children, she worked in human resources consulting.    

 




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