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(review) Elizabeth's New Favorite Ketchup and Mustard



 

July 9, 2012

For years we were a one ketchup and multiple mustard household. A bottle of Heinz Ketchup (and then Hunt's when they ditched the high fructose corn syrup) sat in our refrigerator along with several jars of mustard--Dijon, spicy brown, and a bevy of flavored mustards. Then a trip to Maine changed all this.

As always, we stopped at the Stonewall Kitchen flagship store in York. More than just a store, this place is a destination. Lovely gardens line the path as you enter and the shop sells, of course, the entire line of Stonewall Kitchen products along with kitchenware, linens and body products. We easily spend an hour or so wandering around.

And Greg, who isn't allergic to anything, tries the different jams and sauces Stonewall Kitchen puts out for samples.




 

On our last visit, he tried some Country Ketchup. On a pretzel. I expected him to say that ketchup on a pretzel wasn't a good idea. Instead he surprised me by saying, "This ketchup is so good. We have to get it."

Ketchup? So good? Had we stayed out in the Maine sun too long? I mean, ketchup is ketchup, right?


Stonewall Kitchen's Country Ketchup (left) and Hunt's Ketchup (right)

 

Only this ketchup isn't like "regular" ketchup. The first thing you notice is that it's chunky with pleasant pieces of onion and tomatoes throughout the sauce. It's sweet-spicy too. Mild clove (or is it allspice? I can't tell.) is balanced by red pepper. This stuff is good.

But it hasn't fully replaced my bottle of Hunt's ketchup. See, sometimes--especially on French fries--I just want that smooth, sweet taste of traditional ketchup. Now on burgers or with sweet potato fries, I find myself reaching for the Stonewall Kitchen ketchup. I guess I'd call the Stonewall Kitchen ketchup "grownup ketchup." Not that it's only for adults but it's like the ketchup itself matured.

The only drawback? The price. If you are familiar with the brand, Stonewall Kitchen isn't cheap. As of this writing, the jar of Country Ketchup runs $6.50. (And, I believe, this price has been reduced. I think it used to run around $9.00 a jar. Eeep!)

***

Koops' Arizona Heat

In sharp contrast to the shopping experience offered by Stonewall Kitchen, is the one offered by Ocean State Job Lot. Do you have one of these places? It's sort of an overstock store. They have everything from "pool shock" (don't ask me what that is. I don't have a pool!) to books to food.



 

While browsing there the other day with my mother, I noticed a bottle of Koops' Arizona Heat mustard. It was only $1.70. Since Greg loves mustard, I picked it up, not expecting much. I mean, it was a cheap bottle of mustard. I knew it wouldn't be bad but I didn't think it would be great.

Sometimes, it's nice to be wrong!


Compared to spicy brown mustard (right), the Arizona Heat is bright!

 

What a yummy mustard Arizona Heat turned out to be! This mustard's spice doesn't come from the mustard seed itself. Rather, the spiciness comes from red and green peppers. It's not just spicy, however, there's just enough sweetness to temper it.

And do you know how I'm using it? I'm mixing the mustard into my vinaigrette, I use enough of the mustard to create a "French" style dressing that's fabulous! (I'll post the recipe in a bit! You want this one, trust me!) And next I want to make a batch of chicken, using this mustard as part of the marinade.

Sadly, this mustard isn't available in my grocery store. So I went back to Ocean City and bought three more bottles! After that I'll probably order it on-line if I can't find it locally. If you can get your hands on this stuff, give it a try!

What ketchup and mustard are you using? Tell me in the comments! I want to try new, delicious ketchup and mustard this summer!

Talk to you soon!

Elizabeth



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